Charming is a Victorian Era Harry Potter roleplay set primarily in the village of Hogsmeade, Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, and the non-canon village of Irvingly. Characters of all classes, both magical and muggle — and even non-human! — are welcome.

With a member driven story line, monthly games and events, and a friendly and drama-free community focused on quality over quantity, the only thing you can be sure of is fun!
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    News
    01.11 I've got a bit of a reputation...
    01.06 AC underway, and a puzzle to solve!
    01.01 Happy new year! Have some announcements of varying importance.
    12.31 Enter the Winter Labyrinth if you dare!
    12.23 Professional Quidditch things...
    12.21 New stamp!
    12.20 Concerning immortality
    12.16 A heads up that the Secret Swap deadline is fast approaching!
    12.14 Introducing our new Minister of Magic!
    12.13 On the first day of Charming, Kayte gave to me...
    12.11 Some quick reminders!
    12.08 Another peek at what's to come...
    12.05 It's election day! OOC, at least.
    12.04 We have our PW winners for November!
    12.02 New Skins! In less exciting news, the AC is underway.
    11.27 AC Saturday and election next week!
    11.21 A glimpse at post-move changes.
    11.13 This news is not at all big. Do not bother with it.
     
        
     
    Hogwarts House Sorting - MBTI
    #1
    Myers-Briggs Type Indicators

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) assessment is a psychometric questionnaire designed to measure psychological preferences in how people perceive the world and make decisions. They are loosely based off of the research that Carl Jung (a Swiss psychiatrist and the founder of analytical psychology) produced.

    There are four categories, each dealing with a different part of the personality. The first Favorite World- do you prefer to focus on the outer world or on your own inner world? The second category is Information - do you prefer to focus on the basic information you take in or do you prefer to interpret and add meaning? The third is Decision Making - When making decisions, do you prefer to first look at logic and consistency or first look at the people and special circumstances? Lastly, the fourth category is Structure - in dealing with the outside world, do you prefer to get things decided or do you prefer to stay open to new information and options?

    1.) Favorite World: I for Introverted, or E for Extroverted
    2.) Information: S for Sensing, or N for iNtuition
    3.) Decision Making: T for Thinking, of F for Feeling
    4.) Structure: J for Judging, P for Perceiving

    1.)  Favorite World
    Introverted: "I like getting my energy from dealing with the ideas, pictures, memories, and reactions that are inside my head, in my inner world. I often prefer doing things alone or with one or two people I feel comfortable with. I take time to reflect so that I have a clear idea of what I'll be doing when I decide to act. Ideas are almost solid things for me. Sometimes I like the idea of something better than the real thing."
    Statements that generally apply:
    — Seen as "reflective" or "reserved."
    — Feel comfortable being alone and likes things they can do on their own.
    — Prefer to know just a few people well.
    — Sometimes spend too much time reflecting and don't move into action quickly enough.
    — Sometimes forget to check with the outside world to see if ideas really fit the experience.
    Extroverted: "I like getting my energy from active involvement in events and having a lot of different activities. I'm excited when I'm around people and I like to energize other people. I like moving into action and making things happen. I generally feel at home in the world. I often understand a problem better when I can talk out loud about it and hear what others have to say."
    Statements that generally apply:
    — Seen as "outgoing" or as a "people person."
    — Feel comfortable in groups and like working in them.
    — Has a wide range of friends and knows lots of people.
    — Sometimes jump too quickly into an activity and don't allow enough time to think it over.
    — Before starting a project, they sometimes forget to stop and get clear on what they want to do and why.

    2.) Information
    Sensing: "Paying attention to physical reality, what I see, hear, touch, taste, and smell. I'm concerned with what is actual, present, current, and real. I notice facts and I remember details that are important to me. I like to see the practical use of things and learn best when I see how to use what I'm learning. Experience speaks to me louder than words."

    Statements that generally apply:
    — Remember events as snapshots of what actually happened.
    — Solve problems by working through facts until they understand the problem.
    — Pragmatic and look to the "bottom line."
    — Start with facts and then form a big picture.
    — Trust experience first and trust words and symbols less.
    — Sometimes pay so much attention to facts, either present or past, that they miss new possibilities.
    INtuition: "Paying the most attention to impressions or the meaning and patterns of the information I get. I would rather learn by thinking a problem through than by hands-on experience. I'm interested in new things and what might be possible, so that I think more about the future than the past. I like to work with symbols or abstract theories, even if I don't know how I will use them. I remember events more as an impression of what it was like than as actual facts or details of what happened."
    Statements that generally apply:
    — Remember events by what I read "between the lines" about their meaning.
    — Solve problems by leaping between different ideas and possibilities.
    — Interested in doing things that are new and different.
    — Like to see the big picture, then to find out the facts.
    — Trust impressions, symbols, and metaphors more than what I actually experienced
    — Sometimes they think so much about new possibilities that they never look at how to make them a reality.

    3.) Decision Making
    Thinking: "When I make a decision, I like to find the basic truth or principle to be applied, regardless of the specific situation involved. I like to analyze pros and cons, and then be consistent and logical in deciding. I try to be impersonal, so I won't let my personal wishes--or other people's wishes--influence me."
    Statements that generally apply:
    — Enjoy technical and scientific fields where logic is important.
    — Notice inconsistencies.
    — Look for logical explanations or solutions to most everything.
    — Make decisions with my head and want to be fair.
    — Believe telling the truth is more important than being tactful.
    — Sometimes they miss or don't value the "people" part of a situation.
    — Can be seen as too task-oriented, uncaring, or indifferent.
    Feeling: "I believe I can make the best decisions by weighing what people care about and the points-of-view of persons involved in a situation. I am concerned with values and what is the best for the people involved. I like to do whatever will establish or maintain harmony. In my relationships, I appear caring, warm, and tactful."
    Statements that generally apply:
    — Have a people or communications orientation.
    — Concerned with harmony and nervous when it is missing.
    — Look for what is important to others and express concern for others.
    — Make decisions with their heart and want to be compassionate.
    — Believe being tactful is more important than telling the "cold" truth.
    — Sometimes miss seeing or communicating the "hard truth" of situations.
    — Sometimes experienced by others as too idealistic, mushy, or indirect.

    4.) Structure

    Judging: "I use my decision-making (Judging) preference (whether it is Thinking or Feeling) in my outer life. To others, I seem to prefer a planned or orderly way of life, like to have things settled and organized, feel more comfortable when decisions are made, and like to bring life under control as much as possible. Since this pair only describes what I prefer in the outer world, I may, inside, feel flexible and open to new information (which I am). Do not confuse Judging with judgmental, in its negative sense about people and events. They are not related. "
    Statements that generally apply:
    — Like to have things decided.
    — Appear to be task oriented.
    — Like to make lists of things to do.
    — Like to get my work done before playing.
    — Plan work to avoid rushing just before a deadline.
    — Sometimes focus so much on the goal that they miss new information.
    Perceiving: "I use my perceiving function (whether it is Sensing or Intuition) in my outer life. To others, I seem to prefer a flexible and spontaneous way of life, and I like to understand and adapt to the world rather than organize it. Others see me staying open to new experiences and information. Since this pair only describes what I prefer in the outer world, inside I may feel very planful or decisive (which I am). Remember, in type language perceiving means "preferring to take in information." It does not mean being "perceptive" in the sense of having quick and accurate perceptions about people and events."
    Statements that generally apply:
    — Like to stay open to respond to whatever happens.
    — Appear to be loose and casual. I like to keep plans to a minimum.
    — Like to approach work as play or mix work and play.
    — Work in bursts of energy.
    — Stimulated by an approaching deadline.
    — Sometimes stay open to new information so long that they miss making decisions when they are needed.

    When the preference for each category is decided, you come up with a four letter combination i.e. ISTJ (Introverted Sensing Thinking Judging) or ENFP (Extroverted iNtuition Feeling Perceiving.) There are sixteen different possible personality types. Some overlap each other with only slight tweaks in personality details, while others are polar opposites.

    What does this have to do with the Hogwarts houses? Students are sorted by qualities they value rather than qualities they exhibit into the four houses of Gryffindor, Hufflepuff, Ravenclaw and Slytherin.

    Gryffindor values bravery, daring, nerve, and chivalry. Its emblematic animal is the lion and its colours are scarlet and gold. Gryffindor corresponds to the element of Fire.

    Hufflepuff values hard work, patience, loyalty, and fair play rather than a particular aptitude in its members. Its emblematic animal is the badger, and Black and Yellow are its colours. Hufflepuff corresponds roughly to the element of earth.

    Ravenclaw values intelligence, knowledge, and wit. Its emblematic animal is the eagle, and its colours are blue and bronze. Ravenclaw corresponds roughly to the element of air.

    Slytherin values ambition, cunning and resourcefulness. Its emblematic animal is the serpent, and its colours are emerald green and silver. Slytherin corresponds roughly to the element of water.

    Combined with the Myers-Briggs theory as explained above, we can get a good idea of what type of person would be sorted into each Hogwarts house. Below, you'll find which MBTI type fits with which house as well as a detailed description of each individual personality type.

    Gryffindor Personalities

    ISTJ — Quiet, serious, earn success by thoroughness and dependability. Practical, matter-of-fact, realistic, and responsible. Decide logically what should be done and work toward it steadily, regardless of distractions. Take pleasure in making everything orderly and organized —their work, their home, their life. Value traditions and loyalty. Often focus too much on the current task at the expense of longer term or interpersonal issues. Can irritate others by not articulating understanding of a situation, being too serious, seeming to be inflexible, not encouraging others to experiment or innovate and not promoting their ideas or achievements. When stressed, they are more likely to find a place of solitude in which to think and work, use tried and trusted means of solving problems, direct or criticize others' efforts, have a gloomy view of the future, suggest impractical ideas, act impulsively, change things without thought and have an intense negative feeling toward others. The basic driving force is duty, service and the need to get along.
    Possible ISTJ: Hermoine Granger

    INFP — Idealistic, loyal to their values and to people who are important to them. Want an external life that is congruent with their values. Curious, quick to see possibilities, can be catalysts for implementing ideas. Seek to understand people and to help them fulfill their potential. Adaptable, flexible, and accepting unless a value is threatened. They make decisions based on personal values, assesses the impact of decisions on others and take a personal approach. They develop an inner emotional life that is often unseen to others, but is experienced as intense. Retain a strong sense of values which are not often expressed. They emotionally accept or reject various aspects of life - for example, deciding whether praise or criticism received is valid and, at extreme, ignoring whatever is unacceptable. They can feel appreciation toward others, but don't express it. They often look for meaningful relationships. They generate team spirit through sensitive listening and quiet enthusiasm. They focus on areas of agreement and build on others' proposals. When there is a disagreement, they explore a wide range of options to see if a point of agreement can be found. They can be viewed as appearing out of touch with not fully recognizing current realities and disregarding those they find unacceptable, being stubborn over issues when the problem was not anticipated. They can spend too much time thinking. Often, they avoid conflict and don't giving criticism when it is needed. When under stress, they concentrate only on what they see as important, will work alone, contribute creative ideas but overlook current realities, fail to consider the cost implications, are very critical and find fault with almost everything, doing things in excess (eating, drinking, exercising), become bossy and ignore others feelings and become pedantic about unimportant details. The basic driving force is the search for meaning or purpose.
    Possible INFP: Harry Potter

    ESFP — Outgoing, friendly, and accepting. Exuberant lovers of life, people, and material comforts. Enjoy working with others to make things happen. Bring common sense and a realistic approach to their work, and make work fun. Flexible and spontaneous, adapt readily to new people and environments. Learn best by trying a new skill with other people. They are very responsive to current events and view life as tending to be a succession of events. They constantly seek to change the world to the way they want it to be. They often observe in an objective way - they value facts without putting an interpretation on them. They enjoy action and events for the company of others rather than for the events themselves. They enjoy interaction with others. They are also often impulsive. When in a group, they try to involve everyone in the discussion and decision making, value the strengths of each individual, has a sense of humor, 'can-do' attitude, and maintain awareness of factual information on which discussions are based. They can irritate others however, by taking criticism personally, acting too quickly, focusing on the current task at the expense of longer term or interpersonal issues, not taking account of costs or logical considerations, turning to a new problem before the last one has been completed and over using humor. When under stress, they get quiet and withdraw from people, have a gloomy view of the future, openly criticize other people and stop adapting to changing circumstances.
    Possible ESFP: Ronald Weasley

    ISFJ — Quiet, friendly, responsible, and conscientious. Committed and steady in meeting their obligations. Thorough, painstaking, and accurate. Loyal, considerate, notice and remember specifics about people who are important to them, concerned with how others feel. Strive to create an orderly and harmonious environment at work and at home. They seek to develop a realistic understanding of the world as it is in light of what they observe. They're constantly learning to adapt to the world as it is now. They observe in a subjective way, selecting and relating facts that others would not and seeing those facts more in terms of impressions and significance than pure fact. They focus on the ideas and possibilities they have and how they relate to people. They express appreciation for the contributions of others, particularly when they see it as significant. They make decisions on the basis of values that support their understanding of the world. The basic driving force is duty, service and the need to belong. When in a group, they are hardworking and efficiently complete tasks by the deadline set, build team spirit through maintaining good relationships with each team member, ensure that everyone in the team feels valued, ask for contributions from all team members, maintain respect for established hierarchies and traditions, and strive to ensure that people are happy with the service provided. They often irritate others because they avoid conflict and don't give criticism when needed, not articulating their understanding of the situation, fail to state their own needs, can be too serious and don't promote their own ideas or achievements. When stressed, they will find a place of solitude to think and work, value the efforts of others and appreciate their encouragement, use tried and trusted means of solving problems while possibly failing to recognize the need for change, use pragmatic solutions at the expense of the long term, are intolerant of others who do not act competently, suggest impractical ideas, are critical of others and find fault with almost everything, have a gloomy view of the future and are argumentative.
    Possible ISFJ: Neville Longbottom, Can also be Hufflepuff

    ESTP — Flexible and tolerant, they take a pragmatic approach focused on immediate results. Theories and conceptual explanations bore them— they want to act energetically to solve the problem. Focus on the here-and-now, spontaneous, enjoy each moment that they can be active with others. Enjoy material comforts and style. Learn best through doing. They focus on the impersonal facts and logical options, enjoy action and events for themselves rather than for the company of others and are often materialistic. The basic driving force is to experience and enjoy life. In a group, they are action-oriented and make things happen with a 'can-do' attitude, they focus on practical ideas, apply a common sense approach to problem solving, are aware of factual information when in discussions and take charge in a crisis to organize others. They can irritate others by acting too quickly, focusing on the current task at the expense of longer term or interpersonal issues, not taking account of the sensitivities of others, turning to a new problem before the last one has been completed, seeming materialistic and generating crises as a way of getting things moving. When stressed, they used impulsive energy to overcome whatever obstacles get in the way, generate new actions, use tried and trusted means of solving problems, use pragmatic solutions at the expense of the long term, get quiet and withdraw from people, have a gloomy view of the future, have intense negative feelings of others with may be openly expressed and cease to adapt to changing circumstances.

    Hufflepuff Personalities

    ISFJ — Quiet, friendly, responsible, and conscientious. Committed and steady in meeting their obligations. Thorough, painstaking, and accurate. Loyal, considerate, notice and remember specifics about people who are important to them, concerned with how others feel. Strive to create an orderly and harmonious environment at work and at home. They seek to develop a realistic understanding of the world as it is in light of what they observe. They're constantly learning to adapt to the world as it is now. They observe in a subjective way, selecting and relating facts that others would not and seeing those facts more in terms of impressions and significance than pure fact. They focus on the ideas and possibilities they have and how they relate to people. They express appreciation for the contributions of others, particularly when they see it as significant. They make decisions on the basis of values that support their understanding of the world. The basic driving force is duty, service and the need to belong. When in a group, they are hardworking and efficiently complete tasks by the deadline set, build team spirit through maintaining good relationships with each team member, ensure that everyone in the team feels valued, ask for contributions from all team members, maintain respect for established hierarchies and traditions, and strive to ensure that people are happy with the service provided. They often irritate others because they avoid conflict and don't give criticism when needed, not articulating their understanding of the situation, fail to state their own needs, can be too serious and don't promote their own ideas or achievements. When stressed, they will find a place of solitude to think and work, value the efforts of others and appreciate their encouragement, use tried and trusted means of solving problems while possibly failing to recognize the need for change, use pragmatic solutions at the expense of the long term, are intolerant of others who do not act competently, suggest impractical ideas, are critical of others and find fault with almost everything, have a gloomy view of the future and are argumentative.
    Can also be Gryffindor

    ISTP — Tolerant and flexible, quiet observers until a problem appears, then act quickly to find workable solutions. Analyze what makes things work and readily get through large amounts of data to isolate the core of practical problems. Interested in cause and effect, organize facts using logical principles, value efficiency. They are motivated by freedom and seek to enjoy the present. They spend time thinking analytically and organize thoughts on a logical basis. They can spontaneously feel critical of a person or situation, but may not express it. Inwardly they are decisive, but they can't communicate those decisions to others. In a group, they can be a source of information or an 'expert' on some subjects, use analytic skills ot produce practical solutions to difficult problems, encourage the team to think then act, have a cool head in a crisis, apply relevant and realistic logical arguments, encourages the team to realistically assess the situation. They can irritate others because they focus too much on the current task at the expense of longer term or interpersonal issues, don't complete a task before moving on to the next one, taking shortcuts and seem to flit from one thing to another. When stressed, they withdraw from people to think through possible solutions, use tried and trusted solutions for short-term problems, criticize others efforts and ignore feelings, sort out details points that could wait, display intense feelings toward others or insisting on things being done without any logical basis, being very sensitive to criticism, have a gloomy view of the future and attribute unrealistic negative meaning to others actions or statements.

    ISFP — Quiet, friendly, sensitive, and kind. Enjoy the present moment, what's going on around them. Like to have their own space and to work within their own time frame. Loyal and committed to their values and to people who are important to them. Dislike disagreements and conflicts, do not force their opinions or values on others. They emotionally accept or reject aspects of life - for example, deciding whether praise or criticism received is value and, at extreme, ignoring whatever is unacceptable. They can feel appreciation toward others but don't express it. They focus on current relationship and people through one-to-one discussions and fact-based conversation. Seek to enjoy the company of those they know and are concerned for their well-being and happiness. They help people in practical ways. Their basic driving force is freedom and seeking to enjoy the present. In a group, they can solve problems as they arise especially with ones concerning people, generate team spirit through co-operation and engendering a quiet sense of fun, ensure the wellbeing of team members, are accurate and observant about facts, suggest their own ideas but are considerate of others view points and go with the majority and pay attention to the people side of the problem. They can irritate others by being too concerned with harmony in the group, not pushing their own ideas and contribution enough, being stubborn over issues the group didn't anticipate, avoid conflict and not giving criticism when needed, focus on interpersonal issues so that they impersonal considerations are not addressed, possibly failing to take a long term view and take people at face value rather than recognizing underlying motives. When they're stressed, they concentrate on what they see is important, work alone if possible, act impulsively and take risks, fail to consider the cost implications, are critical and find fault with almost everything, become bossy and ignore others' feelings, have a pessimistic view of the future and see hidden meanings that are not really there.

    ESFJ — Warm-hearted, conscientious, and cooperative. Want harmony in their environment, work with determination to establish it. Like to work with others to complete tasks accurately and on time. Loyal, follow through even in small matters. Notice what others need in their day-by-day lives and try to provide it. Want to be appreciated for who they are and for what they contribute. They take a personal approach and are appreciative and accepting of people. They seek stable, harmonious relationships, tend to adapt to the environment and take on values that are held as important by friends and family or society as a whole, consider others' feelings before their own, and are sensitive to praise and criticism and conform to others' reasonable expectations. Their driving force is duty, service and the desire to belong. They find practical ways to be of service to people, focus on current relationships and people through social events and fact-based conversation and view people subjectively, observing facts that support harmonious relationships. In a group, they work hard and efficiently to complete tasks by the deadline, ensure everyone feels valued, maintain good relationships and build team spirit by enthusiastic organization of social activities, keep the team informed, ask for contributions from all members, maintain respect for established hierarchies and traditions, strive to ensure that people are happy with the service provided. They can irritate others by talking too much, assuming they know the needs of others, avoiding conflict and not giving criticism when needed, not paying attention to their own needs and being reluctant to try out new things or work towards new possibilities. Under stress, they work hard to complete pre-defined tasks, express appreciation for everyone else's efforts, fail to recognize the need for change and neglect their own needs whilst being concerned for others. They can be critical and find fault with everything, have a pessimistic view of the future, suggest ideas that are impractical and ignore others' feelings.

    ENFJ — Warm, empathetic, responsive, and responsible. Highly attuned to the emotions, needs, and motivations of others. Find potential in everyone, want to help others fulfill their potential. May act as catalysts for individual and group growth. Loyal, responsive to praise and criticism. Sociable, facilitate others in a group, and provide inspiring leadership. Makes decisions on the basis of personal values, enjoyed company and seeking harmony and takes a personal approach. They tend to adapt to their environment and take on board values that are held as important by friends and family or society as a whole. They tend to consider others before themselves and are sensitive to praise and criticism. They often seek to conform to others' reasonable expectations. In a team, they promote insight and common understanding, facilitate discussions and encourage contributions from all team members, generate team spirit through their own enthusiasm and bring discussions to positive conclusions. They can irritate others by: talking too much, assuming they know the needs of others, avoiding conflict and not giving criticism, taking criticism personally or focusing so much on interpersonal issues that cost and other impersonal considerations are not adequately addressed. When they are under stress, they can: get everyone organized, express appreciation for their efforts, contribute creative ideas, but overlook current realities, fail to consider the cost implications. Under extreme stress or illness, they can: be very critical and find fault with almost everything, do things to excess - e.g.: eating, drinking or exercising, ask for irrelevant information and ignore others feelings.

    Ravenclaw Personalities

    INFJ — Seek meaning and connection in ideas, relationships, and material possessions. Want to understand what motivates people and are insightful about others. Conscientious and committed to their firm values. Develop a clear vision about how best to serve the common good. Organized and decisive in implementing their vision. Likes looking at information from a global viewpoint, spotting patterns and relationships that lead to an understanding of key issues, focus more on the possibilities for the future than the here-and-now, enjoys change, challenge and variety, seek to develop an understanding of how the world is or can be as well as the patterns underlying their observations. Are strategic in nature and establish a clear vision toward what their working for. They tend not to involve others in the development of their vision. The basic driving force is the search for meaning or purpose. In a group, they observe and understand the team dynamics and encourage the team to recognize them and take appropriate action, listen carefully to various viewpoints and are able to identify potential areas of agreement to be used as a basis to move forward, are trustworthy and meet commitments to a consistent standard, contribute creative ideas particularly those involving people, bring the team to make decisions about important issues and promote harmony and co-operation. They can irritate others by not including them in the developing ideas and vision, not giving criticism or expressing disagreement when appropriate, ignoring current reality in pursuit of insight and meaning, making errors of fact, not promoting their ideas in the group and wanting to pursue ideas without fully thinking through the consequences (such as cost.) Under stress, they might find a place of solitude in which to think and work, tell everyone else how well they're coping, try to solve the long term problem and neglect the short-term one, make errors of fact or ignore routing matters that might be essential, act impulsively, doing things to excess (eating, drinking, exercising), being critical of others and finding fault in almost everything, being preoccupied about unimportant details and doing things that have no meaning, acting in a very materialistic and selfish way, cutting corners, breaking rules and even contradicting their own values.

    INTJ — Have original minds and great drive for implementing their ideas and achieving their goals. Quickly see patterns in external events and develop long-range explanatory perspectives. When committed, organize a job and carry it through. Skeptical and independent, have high standards of competence and performance—for themselves and others. They like looking at information from a global viewpoint, spotting patterns and relationships, that lead to an understanding of the key issues, Focuses more on possibilities for the future than the here-and-now, and Enjoys change, challenge, and variety. They Seek to develop a understanding of how the world can be, understand the patterns underlying their observations, are strategic in nature, wanting to establish a clear vision towards which the INTJ is working and tend to Not involve others in the development of that vision. They focus on ideas and possibilities that relate to systems and concepts, inwardly maintaining a long term vision. Rather than communicating this vision directly, it may tend to surface in the form of criticism of ideas and situations that do not conform, applying logical analysis to perceived patterns and possibilities, enabling the INTJ to quickly see the underlying principles in a situation. The basic driving force is the search for competence or excellence. In a group, they can challenge the status quo, lead the team to a greater understanding of the concepts and principles involved, find ways to overcome apparently insurmountable difficulties, develop and maintain a sense of direction in the team's work, observe and understand the way the organization works, and leading the team to take appropriate action, produce work to a high level of quality, and ensure that ideas and vision are translated into action. They can irritate others by being single-minded or stubborn, not taking sufficient account of current realities, not expressing appreciation for the contributions of others, particularly where it hasn't been fully competent, not delegating and making errors of fact, and appearing to make decisions irrespective of the facts. When stressed, they retire to a private place and think through a problem until the INTJ has formulated a complete plan for solving it, try to maintain a high degree of quality in the solution, criticize others' ideas, particularly if they involve compromising quality, make errors of fact, or pursue ideas that are unrealistic, doing things to excess - e.g.: eating, drinking or exercising, acting very impulsively, perhaps starting off more projects than the INTJ could hope to accomplish, expressing emotions in an intensive and uncontrolled way, being very sensitive to criticism and asking for lots of information that is irrelevant.
    Can also be Slytherin

    INTP — Seek to develop logical explanations for everything that interests them. Theoretical and abstract, interested more in ideas than in social interaction. Quiet, contained, flexible, and adaptable. Have unusual ability to focus in depth to solve problems in their area of interest. Skeptical, sometimes critical, always analytical. They like making decisions on the basis of logic, using objective considerations, are concerned with truth, principles and justice, are analytical and critical, tending to see the flaws in situations and take an objective approach. They spend time thinking analytically, organizing thoughts on a logical basis, develop an understanding of the principles involved in a situation, spontaneously feel critical of a person or situation, but not necessarily express that criticism, are inwardly decisive, but not communicate those decisions to others, and think mostly about impersonal issues, focusing more on concepts, truths and systems rather than individuals' feelings. Their basic driving force is the search for competence or excellence. In a group, they use analytical and critical skills to solve problems, focus attention on the central issue, provide intellectual insight, suggest ideas that achieve long and short term aims and view information objectively. They can irritate others by being too intellectual, finding too many flaws, and not accepting imperfect but 'good enough' solutions, not taking account of others' feelings, suggesting ideas and then appearing to change his/her mind, leave others to worry about implementation once the major problems have been solved, and clinging to a principle at the expense of relationships and harmony. When stressed, they withdraw to think about the central issue that needs attention, suggest various ideas, and use the feedback received to support the intellectual analysis, debate the issue from an intellectual point of view, and leave it very late before making a decision, and criticize others efforts and ignore their feelings. They are also known for expressing intense negative emotions towards others, being very sensitive to criticism, becoming preoccupied with details, without any logical basis and interpreting facts or events in a very subjective way.
    Possible INTP: Luna Lovegood

    ENTJ — Frank, decisive, assume leadership readily. Quickly see illogical and inefficient procedures and policies, develop and implement comprehensive systems to solve organizational problems. Enjoy long-term planning and goal setting. Usually well informed, well read, enjoy expanding their knowledge and passing it on to others. Forceful in presenting their ideas. They like looking at information from a global viewpoint, spotting patterns and relationships, that lead to an understanding of the key issues, focus more on possibilities for the future than the here-and-now, enjoy change, challenge, and variety. They also Seek to develop a understanding of how the world can be, Seek to understand the patterns underlying their observations, can Be strategic in nature, wanting to establish a clear vision towards which the INTJ is working, and Not involve others in the development of that vision. They inwardly maintain a long term vision. Rather than communicating this vision directly, it may tend to surface in the form of criticism of ideas and situations that do not conform and applying logical analysis to perceived patterns and possibilities, enabling the INTJ to quickly see the underlying principles in a situation. Their basic driving force is the search for competence or excellence. In a group, they can contribute by challenging the status quo, leading the team to a greater understanding of the concepts and principles involved, finding ways to overcome apparently insurmountable difficulties, developing and maintaining a sense of direction in the team's work, observing and understanding the way the organization works, and leading the team to take appropriate action, producing work to a high level of quality and ensuring that ideas and vision are translated into action. They can irritate others by being single-minded or stubborn, not taking sufficient account of current realities, not expressing appreciation for the contributions of others, particularly where it hasn't been fully competent, not delegating, making errors of fact, and appearing to make decisions irrespective of the facts. Under stress they retire to a private place and think through a problem until the INTJ has formulated a complete plan for solving it, try to maintain a high degree of quality in the solution, criticize others' ideas, particularly if they involve compromising quality, make errors of fact, or pursue ideas that are unrealistic, doing things to excess - e.g.: eating, drinking or exercising, acting very impulsively, perhaps starting off more projects than the INTJ could hope to accomplish, expressing emotions in an intensive and uncontrolled way, being very sensitive to criticism and asking for lots of information that is irrelevant.

    Slytherin Personalities

    INTJ — Have original minds and great drive for implementing their ideas and achieving their goals. Quickly see patterns in external events and develop long-range explanatory perspectives. When committed, organize a job and carry it through. Skeptical and independent, have high standards of competence and performance —for themselves and others. They like looking at information from a global viewpoint, spotting patterns and relationships, that lead to an understanding of the key issues, Focuses more on possibilities for the future than the here-and-now, and Enjoys change, challenge, and variety. They Seek to develop a understanding of how the world can be, understand the patterns underlying their observations, are strategic in nature, wanting to establish a clear vision towards which the INTJ is working and tend to Not involve others in the development of that vision. They focus on ideas and possibilities that relate to systems and concepts, inwardly maintaining a long term vision. Rather than communicating this vision directly, it may tend to surface in the form of criticism of ideas and situations that do not conform, applying logical analysis to perceived patterns and possibilities, enabling the INTJ to quickly see the underlying principles in a situation. The basic driving force is the search for competence or excellence. In a group, they can challenge the status quo, lead the team to a greater understanding of the concepts and principles involved, find ways to overcome apparently insurmountable difficulties, develop and maintain a sense of direction in the team's work, observe and understand the way the organization works, and leading the team to take appropriate action, produce work to a high level of quality, and ensure that ideas and vision are translated into action. They can irritate others by being single-minded or stubborn, not taking sufficient account of current realities, not expressing appreciation for the contributions of others, particularly where it hasn't been fully competent, not delegating and making errors of fact, and appearing to make decisions irrespective of the facts. When stressed, they retire to a private place and think through a problem until the INTJ has formulated a complete plan for solving it, try to maintain a high degree of quality in the solution, criticize others' ideas, particularly if they involve compromising quality, make errors of fact, or pursue ideas that are unrealistic, doing things to excess - e.g.: eating, drinking or exercising, acting very impulsively, perhaps starting off more projects than the INTJ could hope to accomplish, expressing emotions in an intensive and uncontrolled way, being very sensitive to criticism and asking for lots of information that is irrelevant.
    Can also be Ravenclaw

    ENFP — Warmly enthusiastic and imaginative. See life as full of possibilities. Make connections between events and information very quickly, and confidently proceed based on the patterns they see. Want a lot of affirmation from others, and readily give appreciation and support. Spontaneous and flexible, often rely on their ability to improvise and their verbal fluency. They like looking at information from a global viewpoint, spotting patterns and relationships, that lead to an understanding of the key issues, Focuses more on possibilities for the future than the here-and-now, and Enjoys change, challenge, and variety. They Try ideas out, to explore new possibilities and discover, by experience, which ones work, Change procedures to see if any improvement can be made, rather than just operate them, can Be interested in evolutionary development, but with an eye on the strategy, can Be more interested in exploring ideas than bringing them to closure. They often focus on ideas and possibilities that relate to people, inwardly appreciating the contributions of others, though not expressing it that often, internally rejecting any options that clearly conflict with the ENFP's values - though the rejection might not be expressed or seen to others. The basic driving force is the search for meaning or purpose. In a group they can contribute by acting as a catalyst for change, and encouraging the team to change together, focusing on areas of agreement and building on others' proposals, where there are areas of disagreement, exploring a wide range of options to see if a point of agreement can be found, contributing creative ideas, particularly those involving people, including others in the process of developing ideas and vision, and being very accepting of contributions, even of varying quality, generating team spirit though the ENFP's own energy and enthusiasm. They can irritate others by losing sight of the main purpose of the discussion and going off at tangents, initiating too many projects, and not being able to deliver on all of them, talking too much, introducing too much change, and not leaving well-established, workable routines alone, making errors of fact, wanting to pursue ideas without fully thinking through the consequences in, say, cost terms. Under stress, they involve people in brainstorming ideas, can be democratic about choosing the solution to use, provide a lot of drive, but try to do too much, make errors of fact, or ignore routine matters that might nevertheless be essential. They can also be known for being pedantic about unimportant details, doing things to excess - e.g.: eating, drinking or exercising, being critical of others, and finding fault with almost everything and taking charge without consideration to others.
    Possible ENFP: Tom Riddle/Lord Voldemort

    ENTP — Quick, ingenious, stimulating, alert, and outspoken. Resourceful in solving new and challenging problems. Adept at generating conceptual possibilities and then analyzing them strategically. Good at reading other people. Bored by routine, will seldom do the same thing the same way, apt to turn to one new interest after another. They like looking at information from a global viewpoint, spotting patterns and relationships, that lead to an understanding of the key issues, Focuses more on possibilities for the future than the here-and-now, and Enjoys change, challenge, and variety. They Try ideas out, to explore new possibilities and discover, by experience, which ones work, Change procedures to see if any improvement can be made, rather than just operate them, can Be interested in evolutionary development, but with an eye on the strategy, can Be more interested in exploring ideas than bringing them to closure. They focus on ideas and possibilities that relate to systems and concepts, inwardly maintaining a long term vision. Rather than communicating this vision directly, it may tend to surface in the form of criticism of ideas and situations that do not conform, applying logical analysis to perceived patterns and possibilities, enabling the INTJ to quickly see the underlying principles in a situation. The basic driving force is the search for competence or excellence. In a group they can contribute by challenging the status quo, and encouraging other team members to achieve more than they thought they could, leading other team members to a greater understanding of the concepts and principles involved, involving people who are competent in relevant skills, contributing creative ideas on how the task can be achieved or quality improved, creating new ideas out of confrontational discussion, finding ways to overcome apparently insurmountable difficulties and generating team spirit though the ENTP's own energy and enthusiasm. They can irritate others by initiating too many projects, and not being able to deliver on all of them, introducing too much change, and not leaving well-established, workable routines alone, not taking sufficient account of current realities, appearing competitive and unappreciative of the contribution of others, leaving someone else to do the routine work and making errors of fact. Under stress, they can spend time brainstorming ideas, and debating or critiquing what needs to be done, provide a lot of drive, but try to do too much, draft in people with proven skills to work on the problem, make errors of fact, or ignore routine matters that might nevertheless be essential. They can also be known to being pedantic about unimportant details, doing things to excess - e.g.: eating, drinking or exercising, expressing emotions in an intensive and uncontrolled way and being very sensitive to criticism.

    ESTJ — Practical, realistic, matter-of-fact. Decisive, quickly move to implement decisions. Organize projects and people to get things done, focus on getting results in the most efficient way possible. Take care of routine details. Have a clear set of logical standards, systematically follow them and want others to also. Forceful in implementing their plans. They like to make decisions on the basis of logic, using objective considerations, are concerned with truth, principles and justice, are analytical and critical, tending to see the flaws in situations and take an objective approach. They organize life in on a logical basis, classifying, ordering, and directing facts and situations, can be decisive, with the aim of being just and fair, spontaneously criticize, can be comfortable with conflict as a way of resolving problems and take an impersonal approach, focusing more on systems and organizational needs than each individuals' feelings. They focus on practical decisions that lead to tried and trusted ways of organizing or solving problems and make decisions on immediate considerations - e.g.: short term costs and benefits, and the next step. The basic driving force is duty, service and belonging. In a group, they can contribute by working hard and efficiently to complete tasks by the deadlines set, contributing practical organizational skills, applying relevant and realistic logical arguments, calling a spade a spade and ensuring the team follows through to completion. They can irritate others by focusing too much on the current task at the expense of broader interpersonal issues, being too blunt in giving criticism, not encouraging others to experiment or innovate, not seeing the wood for the trees and not paying enough attention to others' feelings and values. Under stress, they take command, decide what needs to be done, and tell everyone what to do, use tried and trusted solutions to short-term problems, make decisions too quickly, and without considering the impact on people and criticize others efforts and ignore their feelings. They also can be known for withdrawing and wanting to be alone, having intense emotions, that may or may not be expressed, being very sensitive to criticism and attributing unrealistic negative meaning to others actions or statements.
    Possible ESTJ: Draco Malfoy


    Documentation written by exclusively for Charming

    Many thanks to the following sources:
    http://www.myersbriggs.org/my-mbti-personality-type/
    http://www.teamtechnology.co.uk/myers-br...briggs.htm
    http://www.myersbriggs.org/my-mbti-perso...ti-basics/
    http://harrypotter.wikia.com/wiki/Hogwarts_Houses


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